For Information

At BayPath we have an Information Department that can try to answer any elder related questions. Please call or email us with any questions or requests to BayPath's Information & Referral Specialist.
Home
Our Services
Aging News
Employment 
Donations
Who We Are
Under 60
Resources
Volunteers
Contact Us

Contact Us
© 2013 BayPath Elder Services, Inc. | All Rights Reserved | Contact Webmaster
HomeContact UsOur ServicesDonationsPrivacy

  33 Boston Post Road West - Marlborough, MA 01752 - Phone 508-573-7200
BayPath's mission is to be a trusted partner in providing an array of services and programs to older adults, caregivers, and persons with disabilities to support their independence and dignity. 

At BayPath we have an Information Department that will answer your questions with dignity and professionalism. Trained specialists are available Monday through Friday from 9:00a.m. to 5:00 p.m. to answer questions and provide referrals to local, statewide, and national services. 

Information and Referral questions are free. Over 1,200 resources are available to callers ranging from emergency funding to fuel assistance to home adaptive devices and installation.


Caring for a loved one? We're here to help.

CaregivingMetroWest.org, a BayPath program 
with support provided in part by the MetroWest 
Health Foundation, is your one-stop source of 
information, resources and support for 
family caregivers in MetroWest.
Services for People Under 60
    BayPath Elder Services, Inc. also has many programs that assist individuals who are under the age of 60, including children and adolescents. 
    For a complete listing and descriptions of these programs, as well as other helpful resources, please click on the corresponding link below.  
BayPath Elder Services, Inc. is a member of the MetroWest ADRC, a partnership with HESSCO and the MetroWest Center for Independent Living.
MassHealth Releases “Restructuring" Plan 

On April 14, 2016, the $15.4 billion MassHealth program announced a major “restructuring” campaign designed to create “a sustainable, robust” health care program for its 1.8 million members. This process is the culmination of roughly a year of “intensive design and stakeholder engagement,” according to state officials.

MassHealth accounts for almost 40% of the Commonwealth’s budget. The Administration of Governor Charles Baker has made overt moves to swap out the current fee-for-service payment model, which they says results in “fragmented, siloed care,” and replace it with a managed care delivery system experiment which places large hospital and physician networks, known as “Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs),” in control of funding.

The instrument to make this change is a large federal 1115 waiver to support MassHealth restructuring. Financing for the current waiver ends June 30, 2017 with $1 billion in federal support. State law (Chapter 224) requires MassHealth to adopt alternative payment methodologies for promotion of more coordinated and efficient care. ACOs would represent for MassHealth a more “integrated” model of care. In ACO models, the health care providers are accountable for the cost and quality of care. 

At the center of the “restructuring” plan are the ACOs. To be an ACO, providers must show they can coordinate care and partner with Community Partners, including primary, specialty, behavioral, acute, and community-based care. The ACO must have relationships with other providers to coordinate/ integrate care effectively. ACOs will be able to choose to create an integrated ACO/MCO entity or enter into ACO contracts with other MCOs; some ACOs may choose to contract directly with MassHealth.

MassHealth’s timeline calls for pilot ACOs to launch by the end of calendar 2016, with a full roll out of ACOs, BH/LTSS Community Partners and DSRIP by October 2017.

In the LTSS field, the focus is on the relationships between the new ACOs and the new “Community Partners.” (CPs). The ACO plan calls for increased LTSS integration and linkages to social services in ACO models through “explicit requirements for partnering with LTSS Community Partners.” The state will encourage ACOs to “buy” LTSS care management expertise from existing community-based organizations, like the 26 statewide Aging Services Access Points (ASAPs) vs. “building” their own assessment and care coordination capacity. MassHealth plans to invest in infrastructure and capacity to overcome fragmentation amongst community-based organizations.

MassHealth is not requiring ACOs to partner with CPs, but instead trying to use financial incentives to make this happen.

For more information about the MassHealth restructuring, see the full story at Mass Home Care